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Peter A. Munch-Tristan da Cunha Collection [DOC MSS 2] Edit

Summary

Identifier
DOC MSS 2

Dates

  • 1811-1989 (Creation)

Extents

  • 12.20 Linear Feet (Whole)

Agent Links

Notes

  • Physical Description

    9,712 items other_unmapped

  • Abstract

    The material comprising this collection of "Tristania" arrived at Pius XII Memorial Library on 27 October 1986, the gift of Helene Munch, widow of Dr. Peter A. Munch, the creator of the collection. The material was then housed in the Saint Louis Room of the Library.  In September, 1991, Dr. Charles E. Marske, Professor of Sociology at Saint Louis University and a former student of Munch who had been instrumental in Mrs. Munch's donating her husband's papers to the University, requested a more thorough processing of the collection. On 10 September 1991 student worker Angela Dietsch was assigned to process the material to newly established Archives standards. Dietsch departed in 1993, and processing was resumed by Assistant Archivist Christine Froechtenigt Harper in May 1996, being completed in August of that year. This collection includes field notes and manuscripts by Munch, correspondence, scholarly papers, clippings, copies of documents and published materials regarding Tristan, ephemera, and financial records evincing sociologist Munch's fascination with the people and culture of Tristan da Cunha, an island dependency of Great Britain in the South Atlantic Ocean. The material constitutes a remarkable summary of Tristan history and culture from its discovery in the sixteenth century to the mid-1980s, when Munch died, although the bulk of the collection dates from 1937 to 1970, roughly Munch's years of professional involvement with Tristan. This material thus also documents Munch's own research into the relationship between culture and personality as he observed it among the Tristan islanders, especially in the areas of inter-group relations and acculturation. The collection is organized into 25 series: 1. Tristan Legal and Government Documents; 2 & 2B. Tristan History; 3 & 3B. Tristan Clippings; 4 & 4B. Correspondence; 5 & 5B. Manuscripts; 6 & 6B. Papers; 7 & 7B. Notes; 8. Institutional Files; 9. Foundation Files; 10 & 10B. Projects; 11 & 11B. Tristan Administration; 12 & 12B. Tristan Education and Language; 13 & 13B. Tristan Geography; 14. Tristan Maritima; 15. Tristan Music; 16. Tristan Population and Genealogy; 17. Tristan Social Sets; 18 & 18B. Newsletters; 19 &  19B.  Ephemera; 20 & 20B. Financial Records; 21 & 21B. Pamphlets and Brochures; 22B. Philately; 23B. Publications; 24B. Reports; 25B. Scrapbooks.

  • Separated Materials

    Please see collection of photographs which have been separated from this collection:  Peter A. Munch Photograph Collection (AVA PHO 25)

  • Preferred Citation

    Saint Louis University Libraries Special Collections.  Peter A. Munch-Tristan da Cunha Collection (DOC MSS 2)

  • Related Materials

    Please see the following Tristan da Cunha related collections held by Special Collections, Pius XII Memorial Library:  Charles E. Marske -Tristan da Cunha Collection (DOC MSS 26).

  • Scope and Contents

    The Peter A. Munch/Tristan da Cunha Collection provides a nearly complete picture of the history and culture of the South Atlantic island of Tristan da Cunha from its discovery in the sixteenth century to about 1984, when the creator of the collection, Peter A. Munch, died. The bulk of the material dates from 1937 to 1970, the years of Munch's professional relationship with the Tristan people. The items in the collection therefore also highlight Munch's own research interests in the areas of culture and personality, inter-group relations, and acculturation.

    A large part of the collection consists of Munch's research materials on Tristan that include field notes, copies of documents and published materials relating to island history and culture, clippings on recent Tristan developments, and correspondence from Tristan islanders and English expatriates working there. This material encompasses the following series: Tristan Government and Legal Documents; Tristan History; Clippings; Correspondence (Islanders subseries); Notes (with the Topics, Notebooks, Field Work, and File Cards subseries containing the direct results of Munch's on-site work with the islanders); Tristan Administration; Tristan Education and Language; Tristan Geography; Tristan Maritima; Tristan Music; Tristan Population and Genealogy; Tristan Social Sets; Newsletters; Pamphlets and Brochures; Philately; Publications; and Reports.

    The Correspondence Series also includes many letters from Munch's professional colleagues, representatives of publishing houses considering his manuscripts, and the reading public. The Manuscripts Series contains manuscript copies of papers and articles by Munch, while the Papers Series consists of copies of published work by Munch as well as published and manuscript copies of papers, essays, and book excerpts by other authors dealing either with Tristan or general sociological topics.

    The Institutional Files Series contains correspondence, reports, papers, etc. from or about institutions such as the American Anthropological Association, the Kendall Whaling Museum, and the Medical Research Council in the United Kingdom. The Foundation Files Series documents Munch's efforts to secure funds to aid his research, and the Projects Series contains research proposals, correspondence, and financial records related to his trips to visit the islanders at Calshot in 1962 and on Tristan in 1964. The Scrapbooks Series contains material on the Norwegian Expedition to Tristan of 1937-1938 in which Munch took part as well as on Munch's later life and work. (The Clippings Series also includes articles on Munch and his research endeavors.)

    In arranging this collection an effort was made to keep as far as possible the original order imposed upon the material by Munch himself. This was fairly easy to do in the case of the items found in his five-drawer file cabinet, but the material in the B series (the letter appended to a series number) was more problematical. The B series contain material that, while it is an integral part of the collection, cannot be identified as to its original location within Munch's papers. It was not found in his file cabinet but apparently was packed into cardboard boxes. The B series contain types of material analogous to that in the series identified solely by number, which are composed of items from the file cabinet, as well as kinds of material not discovered at all in the cabinet. Thus, Series 2, Tristan History, consists of items from the file cabinet in the general order in which Munch had arranged them; Series 2B, also Tristan History, represents the same kind of material found in disarray elsewhere. Series numbered 21B and above consist of types of material not found at all in the file cabinet. Thus, Series 23B, Publications, consists of whole issues of journals that contain single articles of interest; all of these items were packed in boxes, with no similar material to be found in the file cabinet.

    A word on the items in Scandinavian languages is in order. According to encyclopedias, Norwegian, Swedish, and Danish are mutually intelligible with varying degrees of difficulty. Unless it was possible to establish with fair certainty through contextual evidence which language was being used, I resorted to slash marks to include all the possibilities. Therefore, if an item is obviously in a Scandinavian language but I could not determine which one, I identified it as being in "Norwegian/Swedish," "Norwegian/Swedish/Danish," etc.

Components