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Kurt von Schuschnigg Manuscript Collection [DOC MSS 69] Edit

Summary

Identifier
DOC MSS 69

Dates

  • 1932-1978 (Creation)

Extents

  • 6.00 Linear Feet (Whole)

Agent Links

Notes

  • Physical Description

    1,031 items other_unmapped

  • Abstract

    This collection is divided into 14 series: 1. Book Reviews of Schuschnigg's Im Kampf gegen Hitler and its translation The Brutal Takeover; 2. Clippings about Schuschnigg and Austrian history during the 1930s; 3. Correspondence to and from Schuschnigg and copies of some letters exchanged by German officials and Austrian Foreign Minister Guido Schmidt; 4. Dissertations dealing with the Schuschnigg regime; 5. Ephemera dating from Schuschnigg's time as chancellor; 6. Interviews and Memoirs, including a long interview with Schuschnigg about his early life and political career; 7. Manuscripts of speeches and works by Schuschnigg; 8. Notes by Schuschnigg apparently used to prepare manuscripts; 9. Photographs and Photograph Albums illustrating Schuschnigg's political life; 10. Publications, consisting of whole issues of serial publications or bound volumes of yearly runs ; 11. Reports and Memoranda on the central European political situation in the 1930s; 12. Scrapbooks illustrating Schuschnigg's political career; 13. Works, published speeches, papers, and articles by Schuschnigg; and 14. Supplementary Material, contemporary items such as campaign posters and pamphlets added by archivists to enhance the original donation of Schuschnigg's papers.

  • Conditions Governing Access

    There are no restrictions on access to this collection.

  • Conditions Governing Use

    Restrictions may exist on reproduction, quotation, or publication. Please contact the Saint Louis University Archives for details.

  • Source of Acquisition

    Gift of Kurt von Schuschnigg family

  • Method of Acquisition

    The first part of this collection was donated to Saint Louis University by Kurt von Schuschnigg's children in 1980 and was housed in the History Department.  There an inventory of the material was completed by Robert S. Gerlich, S. J.  In February, 1990, the collection was transferred to the University Archives in Pius Library where it was discovered that many of the items listed in the inventory were missing.  These missing items comprised the entore contents of folders one through five, including manuscripts and published articles by Schuschnigg as well as photocopies of records from Schuschnigg's Gestapo captivity in Vienna.  It is assumed that these papers were lost during periodic moves and/or housecleaning in the History Department.  As much of the missing material as possilbe  has been replaced with photocopies.

    The second part of the collection was sent to the University a year after Gerlich copleted his inventory.  It consisted of scrapbooks and photograph albums, bound materials such as dissertation and magazine, and some clippings and ephemera.  No inventory was made of these items.

  • Preferred Citation

    Saint Louis University Libraries Special Collections.  Kurt von Schuschnigg Manuscript Collection (DOC MSS 69).

  • Scope and Contents

    The Kurt von Schuschnigg Manuscript Collection opens a window on Schuschnigg's political life as the embattled  chancellor of Austria between 1934 and 1938 and his later private existence as controversial elder statesman cum academic attempting to interpret his policies and his time to posterity.

    The Interviews and Memoirs series contains a long interview between Gerhard Jagschitiz and Schuschnigg in which the latter describes his early life and his politcal career up to becoming chancellor in 1934.  The Photographs and Photograph Album Series provides vivid illustrations of Schuschnigg's tenure as chancellor, focusing on state visits and official appearences and dmonstrating how his first wife Herma and son Kurt were integrated into the iconography of his regime.  These images also show Schuschnigg relaxing onf vacation with his son, as well as Engelbert Dolfuss, Schuschnigg's predecessor as chancellor, at worka and at leisure.  The Scrapbooks series offers more such material, including reports on and reprints of Schuschnigg's speeches.

    The Publications series consists of bound volumes such as the illustrated weekly magazine Osterreichische/Oesterreichische Woche (Austrian Week) for 1935 and 1937-1938 containing stories on government initiatives, political events, and the chancellor's public outings.  Also in the Publications series are two volumes documenting the Nazi threat to Austria, the so-called "Austrian Brown Book" and the pamphlet Der braune Terror in Osterreich/Oesterreich (The Brown Terror in Austria), both of which deal with the attempted Nazi coup of July 1934 that culminated in the murder of Chancellor Dollfuss.

    The Reports and Memorand series contains information on the Central European political situation in the 1930s, including Italy relations with Austria, Italian dictator Benito Mussolini's opinion of Schuschnigg and his policies, Germany's interference in internal Austrian affairs, Schuschnigg's blow-by-blow account of the happenings of 11 March 1938, and Austrian President Wilhelm Miklas's briefer report on the same events.  The Supplementary Material series includes postcards and photographs of Schuschnigg and his family, a biography of his first wife Herma, and posters and flyers supporting Schuschnigg's Fatherland Front in the planned 1938 plebiscite.

    The Book Reviews series, with its reviews of the original German edition of Schuschnigg's last book, Im Kampf gegen Hitler, as well as the English translation, The Brutal Takeover, offers assessments of Schuschnigg's regime and its end.  The German manuscript of the book itself is in the Mansucripts seris, as are copiesof speeches given by Chancellor Schuschnigg along with later television commentary and articles by Schuschnigg that deal with the Anschluss and possible military oppostion to Hitler.

    The articles on the Asnchluss, interviews with Schuschnigg, and obitiuaries in the Clippings series provide yet more judgments on Schuschnigg as man and leader, while the Works seris presents Schuschnigg's world view at the end of his life through copies of his speeches, papers, and articles.

Components